Israels fallen heroes 2018-02-04T09:14:00+00:00

Honor Israel’s fallen

We all have an obligation to perpetuate the memory of the 23,632 IDF soldiers and security forces who sacrificed their lives for Israel’s existence, allowing us the privilege of celebrating its upcoming 70th anniversary.

Join our campaign to Honor Israel’s Fallen, in partnership with The Afikim Foundation and Israel’s Ministry of the Diaspora. Our dedicated website www.honorisraelsfallen.com allows each Fallen Hero to be honored by people like you who can select one or more of the fallen, view their photo and short bio, and commit to a positive action in their memory (Torah study, chesed, service, tzedaka, or tefila). A virtual candle will be lit for each action. A record of all actions will be kept at Har Hertzl. 

Select your soldier to honor.

Taming the Inner Critic: Transforming Attitudes by Judging Favorably

On the surface, the mitzvah to visit the sick, bikur cholim, seems to be a self-evident moral obligation to help someone in need – a sick person might need help, or visitors to cheer him up – and that there is not much more to say about it. However, a more detailed look at the mitzvah of bikur cholim will demonstrate that this is one of the noblest activities that man can engage in, whereby he emulates God Himself, as well as fulfilling the mitzvah of loving one’s fellow Jew. This shiur will discuss how visiting the sick entails taking care of a patient’s physical needs, help ease the emotional distress of the patient and pray for his well-being.

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Visiting the Sick

On the surface, the mitzvah to visit the sick, bikur cholim, seems to be a self-evident moral obligation to help someone in need – a sick person might need help, or visitors to cheer him up – and that there is not much more to say about it. However, a more detailed look at the mitzvah of bikur cholim will demonstrate that this is one of the noblest activities that man can engage in, whereby he emulates God Himself, as well as fulfilling the mitzvah of loving one’s fellow Jew. This shiur will discuss how visiting the sick entails taking care of a patient’s physical needs, help ease the emotional distress of the patient and pray for his well-being.

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Hospitality to Guests

One of the most detailed accounts of Avraham’s life in the Torah describes his dedication to the mitzvah of hospitality to strangers. This class will discuss the importance of hospitality and explain how one who performs it emulates the qualities of God Himself. By looking closely at Avraham’s conduct, we will see the ideal way to perform this mitzvah – which includes greeting the guests, letting them wash and rest, making them feel comfortable, giving them food and drink, and escorting them on their way. Finally, we will examine the spiritual reward for this mitzvah.

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Love Your Neighbor: Ahavat Yisrael

The commandment of Ahavat Yisrael – loving one’s fellow Jew – is one of Judaism’s more famous values. As Rabbi Akiva proclaims, “This is a major principle of the Torah!” Yet how can we love our neighbor as we love ourselves? The Sefer HaChinuch teaches that this mitzvah entails protecting another’s property, preventing him from being harmed, speaking only well of him, respecting him, and certainly not glorifying oneself at his expense. Its fulfillment is regarded to be a pre-condition for peace, as well as the prerequisite for the national redemption of the Jewish people.

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Controlling Anger

To enjoy harmonious relationships with one’s spouse, family, friends, and professional associates is a universal human goal. Anger, however, is a character trait that can undermine this basic aspiration. Anger can destroy years of investment in a relationship in a matter of minutes. So why is it that most people are quite content to live with the tendency to become angry? The answer is that most people go through life without ever thinking how destructive anger really is, and conversely, how constructive patience is. And even if someone has this understanding, he may lack practical techniques to control anger. This class will analyze why anger is so destructive and provide insights and tools to help us gain control in the most trying moments.

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The Stunning Power of Speech I: The Cosmic and Spiritual Dynamics of Speech

The Stunning Power of Speech I Power of Speech I Speech is man’s defining quality. No other creature has the ability to communicate in an articulate, creative, and sensitive manner. This shiur will address how man’s words are invested with an almost cosmic power to shape the universe, just as God originally brought the universe into existence with speech. Our words even have the ability to change the reality of time, people, and objects! With this in mind, we can understand why shmirat halashon (guarding one’s tongue) is of such importance in Judaism.

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The Stunning Power of Speech II: Lashon Hara – Destructive Speech

“Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me.” According to Judaism, nothing could be further from the truth. The power of speech, man’s defining quality, can either be an extraordinarily constructive or, if misused, highly destructive force in the universe. In this second class on the Stunning Power of Speech, we will discuss lashon hara, which means “evil speech” – the evil and negativity expressed by a person through communication.

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The Stunning Power of Speech III: Reclaiming the Air Waves

In this final class on the Power of Speech, we will identify the causes of destructive speech and offer suggestions to eradicate lashon hara so that we can harness the productive power and blessings of using proper communication. Finally, we will discuss the importance of keeping one’s word.

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Can You Ever Tell A Lie?

he Torah’s treatment of the topic of truth and falsehood is exquisitely sensitive. The mitzvah to “distance ourselves from falsehood” is not only a prohibition against outright verbal lies that cause direct or indirect loss to another, but includes a prohibition against any gesture or even an act of silence that results in a deceptive message being understood by the observer. This shiur addresses the mitzvah to avoid falsehood, and to strive for honesty and integrity. It also discusses how Judaism defines and values the idea of “truth.” Finally we examine certain situations where the Torah allows for an altering of the truth to allow for a more important Torah-defined goal.

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